Sir Alf Ramsey Honoured with Walk Of Fame Plaque

3 April 2017


The Football Walk of Fame has reached Suffolk, with a plaque in honour of one of the most remarkable football managers of all time presented at Portman Road this weekend, ahead of Ipswich Town's Championship draw with Birmingham City.

Sir Alf Ramsey was one of 25 inaugural figures in the The Football Walk of Fame, a partnership between the National Football Museum and iconic sports artist Paul Trevillion, launched at the Manchester-based museum ahead of their 50th Anniversary 1966 World Cup Exhibition last June. Since then the museum has been taking commemorative plaques to clubs around the country in celebration of those included on the Walk of Fame.

Artist Paul Trevillion presenting the Alf Ramsey Football Walk Of Fame plaque at Portman Road, alongside (l-r) Andy Nelson, Pat Godbold & Ray Crawford.

Artist Paul Trevillion presenting the Alf Ramsey Football Walk Of Fame plaque at Portman Road, alongside (l-r) Andy Nelson, Pat Godbold & Ray Crawford.

Ramsey's portrait, by ‘You Are The Ref’ artist Trevillion is immortalized in a bronze plaque, alongside the 11 men who played in the 1966 World Cup final, and global greats like Pelé, Diego Maradona and Cristiano Ronaldo.

Ramsey’s achievements, though, run deeper than 'just' winning the 1966 World Cup, for what he accomplished at Ipswich may very well be the most remarkable rise of a football club through the leagues in the history of the English game.

Representatives of the National Football Museum team and ‘master of movement’ Paul Trevillion presented a copy of the plaque to the Portman Road club ahead of the Tractor Boys' 1-1 draw with Birmingham City.

Receiving the plaque on behalf of Ipswich Town and Sir Alf were Pat Godbold, Ramsey's secretary at Ipswich, and two former players, Andy Nelson and Ray Crawford, who were part of Ramsey's 1961/62 First Division Champions.

Football Walk Of Fame plaque depicting Sir Alf Ramsey, by Paul Trevillion.

Football Walk Of Fame plaque depicting Sir Alf Ramsey, by Paul Trevillion.

Crawford said: “Alf’s achievements in football must always be remembered.

“He was a real gentleman, there was never any bad language, you knew where you stood with him and you wanted to do well for him. He never asked you to do something you couldn’t do and he always picked the right teams.

“I love this plaque because you can see the warmth in his eyes. That was him.”

Artist Paul Trevillion spoke to press, explaining his affection for the former England manager and Spurs full-back: “I got to know Alf quite well when he was a Tottenham player and I was working on the Lilywhite magazine in the 50s. He was known as ‘The General’ because he always demanded the ball.

“Later in life he pulled me up on one of my Roy of the Rovers drawings. He said ‘you’ve drawn him leaning back too much, that shot would have gone over the bar’. He was a football man from the top of his head to the bottom of his toes.”

“Forget what Leicester did last season, Ipswich Town is still English football’s biggest ever fairytale.”

National Football Museum Interim Director Kevin Haygarth, speaking of the England and Ipswich legend said “To do what Sir Alf Ramsey did with Ipswich, taking them from near the bottom of the then Third Division South to First Division Champions was remarkable. That achievement alone would have put him amongst the top managers of English football, but then of course he went on to top that quite spectacularly in 1966.”

The plaque will reside at Portman Road in the Sir Alf Ramsey Stand in the concourse area.

Sir Alf Ramsey's Football Walk of Fame plaque is the latest special presentation, with special Walk Of Fame plaques also now at Craven Cottage (George Cohen), Deepdale (Tom Finney), Bloomfield Road (Alan Ball) and in St Helen's (Lily Parr).

The Football Walk Of Fame at the National Football Museum is sponsored by you-are-the-ref.com.